Help Save The Historic Stanley Theater 

built in 1936, this art deco gem has endured to become a centerpiece of the community of Stanley Wisconsin, currently restored to its original glory by the Eslinger family (who have owned the theater since 1968)  

The Stanley provides accessible and affordable family entertainment ($1 dollar movie nights in the summer!) promotes free events in the community as well as runs a program to aid students with disabilities. Through the eighties and nineties, large commercial cinema chains saw the demise of many small town single screen theaters.

While some theaters were able to survive by being close to large urban areas (opening cafes and coffee shops in addition to running classic films) these theaters that keep small town mainstreets alive rely on being able to run current films. 

So if the Eslingers could hang on through the lean years to restore their art deco facade of vintage Vitrolite glass, interior murals and seating, what could bring about their demise? The conversion from 35mm film prints to digital projection. The major studios are no longer producing 35mm film (such as Captain America the Winter Soldier or How To Train Your Dragon2) but send out their product on digital discs for theaters to display. 

The costs of conversion to digital are high, as not only the projection units are needed, but upgrades in electrical, sound, etc. can cost tens of thousands of dollars. This switch to digital is forcing the closure of many small town gems like the Stanley.

Check the Stanley Theater Website and support their Kickstarter to help the digital conversion. 

Film Rec - Tokyo Godfathers by Satoshi Kon
Since watching Millenium Actress, Satoshi Kon has become one of my favourite directors, and I don’t mean just in anime. Tokyo Godfathers in parts reminded me of screwball comedies of the 1930’s and 40’s with it’s eccentric characters and incredible plot twists, but throughout I am reminded that the story (of a baby discovered by three homeless people) could happen nowhere but Tokyo, as its themes are particularly Japanese. The sense of duty to one’s family and what creates a family (as adoption has been common for centuries). Of course the animation is breathtaking, but the viewer isn’t reminded of it in a static way with pretty pictures but constant motion. The characters, in particular the onnagata (entertainer specializing in female roles) stand out as fully realized individuals that remain in your memory long after the film has ended. And I burst out laughing at a particular song that any Westerner would know. 

Film Rec - Tokyo Godfathers by Satoshi Kon

Since watching Millenium Actress, Satoshi Kon has become one of my favourite directors, and I don’t mean just in anime. Tokyo Godfathers in parts reminded me of screwball comedies of the 1930’s and 40’s with it’s eccentric characters and incredible plot twists, but throughout I am reminded that the story (of a baby discovered by three homeless people) could happen nowhere but Tokyo, as its themes are particularly Japanese. The sense of duty to one’s family and what creates a family (as adoption has been common for centuries). Of course the animation is breathtaking, but the viewer isn’t reminded of it in a static way with pretty pictures but constant motion. The characters, in particular the onnagata (entertainer specializing in female roles) stand out as fully realized individuals that remain in your memory long after the film has ended. And I burst out laughing at a particular song that any Westerner would know.